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2015 Season

R&J-Main-Nav-Page-ImageRomeo and Juliet

The World’s Most Enduring Love Story
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Charles Fee

Shakespeare’s powerfully poetic and tragic tale of love and loss will steal your heart and leave you breathless. Transcending the hate of warring factions, two young, star-crossed lovers risk all they have to be together. However, the same passion that stirs the lovers’ hearts also fuels the wrath of their feuding families and exacts heart-rending results.

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Media 

Click here to download the 2015 Playbill

Sights & Sounds: Click Here for Full Gallery of Production Photos

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Photos by Joy Strotz

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Photos by Joy Strotz
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About the Show:

From the Director…
“Three civil brawls bred of an airy word …”

For Shakespeare’s audience, the experience of civil strife (central to the plot of Romeo and Juliet) was as palpable as the bloody heads of the political and religious dissidents festooning London Bridge. Queen Elizabeth I reigned over a nation engaged in a bitter sectarian conflict — pitting Protestants against Catholics — which began when her father, Henry VIII, severed ties with the Roman Catholic Church and declared himself Supreme Head of the Church in England.

With that, Henry ushered into England the movement known as the Protestant Reformation, as well as a period of horrific sectarian feuding. Elizabeth I succeeded to the crown following the blood bath of “Bloody Mary’s” Counter-Reformation and began her reign by executing nearly as many Catholics as Mary had Protestants.

By the time Romeo and Juliet played before an audience in London, Elizabeth had been on the throne for 37 years, not one of which had passed without some fresh attempt to overthrow the government or murder the Monarch herself. For her part, the Queen rarely let a season pass without the public execution of a political rival or enactment of yet another law to enforce loyalty to the crown and the Church of England.

It is in this context that one must imagine Romeo and Juliet. The Prince’s arrival in the first scene of the play would have sent a chill down the spines of every member of the theater, as he admonishes the fighting families with a speech clearly understood by Shakespeare’s contemporaries,

Rebellious subjects, enemies of peace …
On pain of torture from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper’d weapons to the ground
And hear the sentence of your moved Prince.

This was no idle threat to a theatergoer of the day, nor was it a dramatic flourish on Shakespeare’s part. Torture was a very real punishment for rebellion, and the rack was a favored instrument of coercion used by Elizabeth’s secret police to extract confessions. Elizabeth’s rule has been characterized by some scholars (most recently, Clare Asquith in her intriguing book, Shadowplay) as a period of “unprecedented authoritarianism, a police state … an age of terror … torture and brutal execution.” For Shakespeare and his audience, the sword fights onstage cut dangerously close to the bone, driving home the relevance of this old tale of star-crossed lovers and feuding families.

But this is not an argument to suggest that the Prince is really Queen Elizabeth, trying to keep her quarrelsome Protestants and Catholics (Capulets and Montagues) from killing each other off. I’ll leave that provocative discussion to Ms. Asquith! Rather, I am trying to build a case for understanding what has always seemed one of the many difficult problems in producing this extraordinary play: namely, to create an experience of true danger in Verona’s streets, a sense of the nearness of death and destruction that haunts every moment of the play. For it is against this backdrop of extreme danger — so present in Shakespeare’s theater — that the wild rush of emotions and the desperate urgency that drives the action of the play become clear.

Most important of all, in this play that Harold Bloom describes as “the largest and most persuasive celebration of romantic love in Western literature,” is that the danger surrounding the characters of Romeo and Juliet acts to intensify our experience of their love, and that the real danger surrounding Shakespeare’s theater would have amplified that already intense event!

Is it possible that the world we live in today has become too dangerous to serve as a backdrop even for this play? We may risk overwhelming the play with too direct a reference to our own experience. Shakespeare’s technique is to create distance from the events of his day by choosing well-known stories set in exotic lands and allowing the audience to connect the dots. Our work on Shakespeare’s plays often leads us to draw a comparison with something we recognize but still have some theatrical distance from, a simile that helps underscore what we find potent or relevant for our audience. The simile gives the director and the design team (and, ultimately, the acting company) a common point of reference, an anchor in the sea of decisions that must be made when creating a production. Sometimes, the point of reference is a specific historical moment. Other times we refer to a set of conventions or stylistic devices we believe appropriate to the play. In every case, our success or failure is measured not by the cleverness of the simile but by the experience our audience has of the play.

Our work on Romeo and Juliet has lead us to these decisions: Verona must be a city of danger, a war-torn city just recovering from the first World War (images of the bombed ruins of Italy and Europe after both World Wars have been used in our research, as have more recent images of the ravages of war in the Middle East). The scenic design shows a fragment of a Renaissance wall being supported by scaffolding — a metaphor we all respond to: a 400 year-old piece of art supported by a contemporary framework! The feud of the Capulets and the Montagues must feel all encompassing, not just two households but a broader, political conflict that the Prince is grappling with. Our discussions include the rise of Mussolini and the Fascist party after World War I, which locates the costume designs in the late 1920s. Our intention is that the world of Verona will reflect elements of totalitarianism, a police state, with Prince Escalus and the Montagues representative of an older, aristocratic order and the Capulets as rising industrialists, perhaps aligning with the Fascists; Tybalt as a “Black Shirt.” As with any production at this point in development — one month before rehearsal starts, decisions may change … but this is our starting point.

Charles Fee, Director, Romeo and Juliet

 

Synopsis

Verona is home to two feuding noble houses, the Montagues and the Capulets. In response to the constant brawling between members of these families, the Prince of Verona has issued an edict that will impose a death sentence on anyone caught dueling. Against this backdrop, young Romeo of the house of Montague has recently been infatuated with Rosaline, a niece of Capulet. Rosaline is quickly forgotten, however, when Romeo and his friends disguise themselves and slip into a masquerade ball at Capulet’s house. During the festivities, Romeo catches his first glimpse of Juliet, Capulet’s daughter. Romeo steals into the garden and professes his love to Juliet, who stands above on her balcony. The two young lovers, with the aid of Friar Lawrence, make plans to be married in secret.

Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin, later discovers that Romeo has attended the ball, and he sets out to teach the young Montague a lesson. Romeo is challenged by Tybalt, but tries to avoid a duel between them since he is now married to Juliet (making Tybalt a kinsman). Mercutio, Romeo’s best friend, takes up Tybalt’s challenge and is killed in the ensuing fight. Enraged, Romeo slays Tybalt. As a result, the Prince banishes Romeo from Verona. Romeo bids farewell to Juliet, though he hopes to be reunited with her once the Capulets learn that they are man and wife.

The Capulets, meanwhile, press for Juliet to marry Paris, a cousin to the Prince. Juliet, relying again on Friar Lawrence, devises a desperate plan to avoid her parents’ wishes. She obtains a drug that will make her seem dead for 42 hours. While she is in this state, Friar Lawrence will send word to Romeo of the situation so that he can rescue her from her tomb. Unfortunately, the letter from Friar Lawrence is delayed. Romeo instead hears second-hand news that Juliet has died. Grief-stricken, Romeo purchases poison and hastens to Juliet’s tomb to die at her side. Meanwhile, Friar Lawrence has discovered to his horror that his letter did not arrive, and he means to take Juliet away until he can set things right.

At the tomb, Romeo encounters Paris, who mourns for Juliet. Romeo slays Paris, then enters the tomb and drinks his poison. As Friar Lawrence comes upon the scene, Juliet awakens only to find the lifeless body of her beloved Romeo. Juliet takes the dagger from Romeo’s belt and plunges it into her heart. Upon this scene, the Prince arrives — along with the Montague and Capulet parents — demanding to know what has happened. Nothing can be done, nothing can be saved. The families look in horror at the tragic consequences of their fatal feud.

— From www.bardweb.net

Acting Company

Escalus, Prince of Verona….Michael Padgett*
Mercutio, kinsman to the Prince….Jeffrey C. Hawkins*
Paris, kinsman to the Prince….Matthew Capbarat

Montague…Justin Ness*
Lady Montague… Mary Bennett
Romeo, Montague’s son…Matt Schwader*
Benvolio, nephew of Montague…Pedar Benson Bate*
Abram, a Montague servant…Liam Callister
Balthasar, Romeo’s servant…Gregory Klino

Capulet…Mic Matarese*
Lady Capulet …Erin Partin*
Juliet, Capulet’s daughter…Hillary Clemens*
Tybalt, Lady Capulet’s nephew…Dan Lawrence*
Nurse …Laura Welsh Berg*
Peter, a Capulet servant…M. A. Taylor*
Sampson, of the Capulet household…Clare Howes Eisentrout*
Gregory, of the Capulet household…Joe Atack

Friar Laurence, of the Franciscan order…Lynn Robert Berg*
Friar John, of the Franciscan order…Gregory Klino

Ensemble… Joe Atack, Mary Bennet, Michelle Calhoun, Liam Callister, Matthew Capbarat, Clare Howes Eisentrout *, Gregory Klino, Meredith Lark*, Justin Ness*, Michael Padgett*, Matthew Webb, Nick Wilders

Understudy… Isaac Hickox-Young

Click here for full actor biographies.

Production Team

Director – Charles Fee
Scenic Designer – Gage Williams
Costume Designer – Star Moxley
Assistant to the Costume Designer – Kristine Davies
Lighting Designer – Rick Martin
Sound Designer – Peter John Still
Fight Choreographer- Ken Merckx
Choreographer – Helene Peterson
Stage Manager – Tim Kinzel*
Assistant Stage Manager- Sarah Kelso*
Fight Captain- Lynn Robert Berg*
Dance Captain- Clare Howes Eisentrout*

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The loving young couple of Matt (actor, Pedar Benson Bate) and Luisa (actor, Clare Howes Eisentrout) are showered by The Mute’s (actor, Meredith Lark, above) magical rain in Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival’s production of The Fantasticks at Sand Harbor State Park which runs through August 23. (Photo by Joy Strotz)The Fantasticks

The World’s Longest Running Musical

Book & lyrics by Tom Jones / Music by Harvey Schmidt
Directed by Victoria Bussert

A charming and romantic musical about one young couple, two “feuding” fathers and an infinite love that transcends over time, The Fantasticks whimsically whisks audiences on a journey of imagination into a world of moonlight, magic and memory. Along the way, love is found, lost and rediscovered again after a poignant realization that “without a hurt, the heart is hollow.”

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Media

Click Here to download the 2015 Playbill

Sights & Sounds Click Here for Full Gallery of Production Photos

An exceptional ensemble comprised of (from left to right) Michael Padgett, Lynn Robert Berg, Pedar Benson Bate, Clare Howes Eisentrout, Justin Ness and Meredith Lark shares the spotlight expertly accompanied by Musical Director Matthew Webb (back left) and Assistant Musical Director Nick Wilders (back right) in Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival’s production of The Fantasticks at Sand Harbor State Park which runs through August 23. (Photo by Joy Strotz)
Photos by Joy Strotz

A pair of fathers, Bellomy (actor, Justin Ness, left) and Hucklebee (actor, Lynn Robert Berg, right), conspire to make a love connection between their daughter and son respectively in Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival’s production of The Fantasticks at Sand Harbor State Park which runs through August 23. (Photo by Joy Strotz)
Photos by Joy Strotz
Mortimer (actor, Jeffrey C. Hawkins, left) and Henry (actor, M.A. Taylor, right) share a comic moment in Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival’s production of The Fantasticks at Sand Harbor State Park which runs through August 23. (Photo by Joy Strotz) El Gallo (above, Michael Padgett) and Luisa (actor, Clare Howes Eisentrout) share a tender moment in Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival’s production of The Fantasticks at Sand Harbor State Park which runs through August 23. (Photo by Joy Strotz)


Check back soon for more information.

About the Show

The Fantasticks tells the story of a young man and the girl next door, whose parents have built a wall to keep them apart. The youngsters nevertheless contrive to meet and fall in love. Their parents, meanwhile, are congratulating themselves, for they have erected the wall and staged a feud in order to achieve, by negation, a marriage between their willfully disobedient children.

A narrator sets the imagined scene and, in due time, progresses to the role of professional abductor, convincing the giddy youngsters that they are deeply embroiled in a melodramatic encounter in a garden under the moonlight. The evening itself is entirely concerned with the notion that children – of whatever age – cannot fall in love unless their love is forbidden.
The abductor pretends to fall before the onslaught of the young man, letting the boy think he is a hero when he rescues the girl from a band of villains. The night is full of moonlight and romance.
The sun comes up and the day brings an end to dreams. The lovers must be taught to face reality. The dashing vagabond, who was their guide to romance and illusion, becomes their instructor in disillusionment. It is only when he has shown the boy the harshness of the world that looks so filled with promise of bright adventure, and has let the girl see that love can be false, that they come to understand each other.

Acting Company

Dramatis Personae
Matt……………. Pedar Benson Bate*
Luisa………….. Claire Howes Eisentrout*
Bellomy……….. Justin Ness*
Hucklebee……. Lynn Robert Berg III*
Henry………….. M.A. Taylor*
Mortimer……….Jeffrey C. Hawkins*
The Mute…….. Meredith Lark*
El Gallo………. Michael Padgett*

Orchestra- Matthew Webb, Nick Wilders

Click here for full actor biographies.

Production Team

Production Staff
Director- Victoria Bussert
Choreographer- Gregory Daniels
Musical Director- Matthew Webb
Scenic Designer- Gage Williams
Costume Designer- Esther M. Haberlen
Lighting Designer- Jeff Herrman
Sound Designer- David Gotwald
Musical Director- Matthew Webb
Fight Choreographer- Ken Merckx
Production Stage Manager- Tim Kinzel*
Assistant stage Managers- Sarah Kelso*
Dance Captain- Meredith Lark*

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Monday Night Showcase

Every Monday night during the 2015 season don’t miss a diverse lineup of fantastic live entertainment. The performance series will take place on the Warren Edward Trepp Stage at scenic Sand Harbor State Park.

Sierra Nevada Ballet
Romeo and Juliet: The Ballet

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July 27, 2015 @ 7:30 pm
Orders of ten or more tickets must purchase by phone at 1-800-74-SHOWS.
Single Tickets: $25-$75 / Tables: $140-$280 (Tables seat 2 or 4.)

Enjoy a new interpretation of a famous classic love story brought to life through dance and set to the haunting music of Sergei Prokofiev. Considered one of the “great” full length dance dramas of all time, Romeo and Juliet: The Ballet features a company of 30 dancers led by ballet professionals from across the country. Shakespeare’s classic is re-imagined for contemporary audiences as the Sand Harbor production unfolds through the eyes of Lady Capulet, the mother of Juliet, highlighting the position of women during the Italian Renaissance.

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The 2nd Annual Prim Jazz Night at Sand Harbor
Mindi Abair
Acclaimed Powerhouse Saxophonist/Vocalist

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August 3, 2015 @ 7:30 pm
Orders of ten or more tickets must purchase by phone at 1-800-74-SHOWS.
Single Tickets: $29-$89 / Tables: $178-$356 (Tables seat 2 or 4.)

In a career that spans seven solo albums and countless collaborations in the studio and live on stage, Mindi Abair, a two-time Grammy nominee, has made her mark on a broad stretch of the musical landscape that includes jazz, pop, rock, R&B, soul, funk and more. Her impressive list
of credits include ten #1 radio hits, a two-season stint as the saxophonist on American Idol, a national tour with Aerosmith, collaborations with Bruce Springsteen and Booker T and appearances on the Late Show with David Letterman. Mindi will surely set Sand Harbor a-rockin’ this summer with her unique blend of infectious energy and extraordinary talent.

Mindi Abair supports Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival! Will you?

Our house right Premium and Café Table and Chairs seating sections have been designated as LTSF fundraiser seats for this concert! Tickets in these sections are $200 each and include a cocktail party and meet and greet with the artists! For more information or tickets, call (775) 298-0163.

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Tahoe Family Solutions
Miracle in the Andes with Nando Parrado

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August 10, 2015 @ 7:30 pm
Orders of ten or more tickets must purchase by phone at 1-800-74-SHOWS.
Single Tickets: $50-$125 / Tables: $250-$500 (Tables seat 2 or 4.)

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to experience world renowned speaker and author Nando Parrado as he takes the stage to share his extraordinary story of surviving the Uruguayan rugby team’s tragic plane crash in the Andes Mountains. This legendary tale of courage, teamwork, determination, faith, family, perseverance and the power of the human spirit will touch your heart and stir your soul. Many have read his best-selling book Miracle in the Andes or seen Alive, the movie that it inspired. Few have had the opportunity to experience his enlightening, powerful and memorable first person account – one that places a new perspective on the value of human life.

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Reno Philharmonic Orchestra
Beatles at the Beach

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August 17, 2015 @ 7:30 pm
Orders of ten or more tickets must purchase by phone at 1-800-74-SHOWS.
Single Tickets: $50-$110 / Tables: $250-$500 (Tables seat 2 or 4.)

Imagine The Beatles playing in concert with a symphony orchestra. What would that have sounded like? Find out for yourself when Classical Mystery Tour performs live in concert with the Reno Philharmonic conducted by Jason Altieri. The four musicians in Classical Mystery Tour look and sound just like The Beatles! The full show presents some thirty Beatles tunes sung, played, and performed exactly as they were written. From early Beatles music on through the solo years, Classical Mystery Tour is the best of The Beatles like you’ve never heard them: totally live at Lake Tahoe.

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Summer Encore Showcase

InnerRhythms
Midsummer Nightmare: Xistence

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Friday, August 27, 2015 @ 7:30 pm
Saturday, August 28, 2015 @ 7:30 pm
Orders of ten or more tickets must purchase by phone at 1-800-74-SHOWS.
Single Tickets: $32-$89 / Tables: $178-$356 (Tables seat 2 or 4.)

Midsummer Nightmare is back! Premiering at Sand Harbor State Park to sold-out audiences in 2007, the new Nightmare features a collection of exceptional performers that entertain with a wild mix of dance, special acts and live music. Representing “Air, Earth, Fire, and Water,” the performers tell the story of the battle between human and natural elements – an epic that explores our differences and embraces our dreams of unity and the future.

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 Reno Jazz Orchestra
“Perfectly Frank” Featuring Bobby Caldwell

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Saturday, September 5, 2015 @ 7:30 pm
Orders of ten or more tickets must purchase by phone at 1-800-74-SHOWS.
Single Tickets: $25-$75 / Tables: $150-$300 (Tables seat 2 or 4.)

Take a trip down memory lane with the Reno Jazz Orchestra and enjoy Sinatra’s most famous tunes performed by some of the finest jazz musicians in the West. Presented in true Sinatra style by acclaimed soul, pop and rhythm and blues stylist and singer-songwriter, Bobby Caldwell, this swinging night of big band music and songs under the stars is sure to delight. If Frank Sinatra were alive today to celebrate his 100th birthday this year, he would be proud to play Sand Harbor!

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Trails & Vistas
World Concert: A Peace Project of Truckee Tahoe

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Saturday, September 12, 2015 @ 6:30 pm
Orders of ten or more tickets must purchase by phone at 1-800-74-SHOWS.
Single Tickets: $23-$68 / Tables: $136-$272 (Tables seat 2 or 4.)

Grammy Award-winning Pacific Mambo Orchestra (PMO) will close out the Summer Encore Showcase series with rhythms and beats performed in English, Spanish, French and Portuguese. A true Big Band, Pacific Mambo Orchestra mixes the tradition of the 1950s mambo-craze with an intoxicating contemporary energy and features thirteen extraordinary musicians and vocalists. PMO is one of the best Latin Big Band Orchestras in the world. Opening acts will include the soulful world-style blues of local musician Peter Joseph Burtt, Taiko drumming, violinist Scarlet Rivera and jazz harp musician Motoshi Kosako.

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Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival is pleased
to work with these Showcase Partners!

Mindi Abair

InnerRhythms

Reno Jazz Orchestra

Reno Philharmonic Orchestra

Sierra Nevada Ballet

Tahoe Family Solutions

Trails & Vistas

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